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From the washingtonpost.com article:
China announced Tuesday that it will again sharply increase its military spending this year, budgeting a 17.6 percent rise that is roughly equal to last year’s increase.

Disclosure of plans for a $59 billion outlay in 2008 followed a Pentagon report Monday that raised questions about China’s rapidly increasing military budget, and came less than three weeks before a presidential election in Taiwan, the self-governed island over which China claims sovereignty.

A Chinese government spokesman said the country’s decade-long military buildup does “not pose a threat to any country,” but he warned that relations with Taiwan were at a “crucial stage” and that the island would “surely pay a dear price” if it were to take steps that China viewed as a declaration of independence.

At the same time Taiwanese choose a president, they also will vote on a referendum issue asking whether the island should apply for U.N. membership under the name Taiwan.

China’s reported $59 billion budget is still a fraction of what the United States spends each year on its armed forces. President Bush last month requested $515 billion to fund the Pentagon in fiscal 2009, a 7.5 percent increase, plus $70 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The United States has pressed China to be more open about its intentions as the scope of its military capabilities and pace of spending increase. At a Pentagon briefing Monday, David Sedney, deputy assistant defense secretary for East Asia, reiterated the U.S. view that China’s defense establishment still severely underreports total spending and has not been clear about its intentions.

“China’s military buildup has been characterized by opacity,” Sedney told reporters, and “by the inability of people in the region and around the world to really know what ties together the capabilities that China’s acquiring with the intentions it has.”

The Pentagon report said China’s near-term focus remains on preparations for potential problems in the Taiwan Strait. But China’s nuclear force modernization, its growing arsenal of advanced missiles and its development of space and cyberspace technologies are changing military balances in Asia and beyond, the report concluded.

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From the article:
The United States is worried that Russia, China and OPEC oil-producing countries could use their growing financial clout to advance political goals, the top U.S. spy chief told Congress on Tuesday.

Such economic matters joined terrorism, nuclear proliferation and computer-network vulnerabilities as top U.S. security threats described by National Director of Intelligence Michael McConnell in an annual assessment.

McConnell said U.S. intelligence agencies had “concerns about the financial capabilities of Russia, China and OPEC countries and the potential use of their market access to exert financial leverage to political ends.”

Russia, bolstered in part by oil revenues, was positioning itself to control an energy supply and transportation network from Europe to East Asia, and the Russian military had begun to reverse a long decline, he told the Senate Intelligence Committee.

China has pursued a policy of global engagement out of a desire to expand its growing economy and obtain access markets, resources, technology and expertise, McConnell said.

It seeks a constructive relationship with the United States and other countries, but as its influence grows “Beijing probably will increasingly expect its interests to be respected by other countries,” he said.

Russia and China have long been able to target U.S. computer systems to collect intelligence, he said. “The worrisome part is, today, they also could target information infrastructure systems for degradation or destruction.”

In the energy sector, a weak U.S. dollar had prompted some oil suppliers, including Iran, Syria and Libya, to ask for payment in other currencies, or to delink their currencies from the dollar, McConnell said. “Continued concerns about dollar depreciation could tempt other producers to follow suit.”

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From the article:
A commission concludes that China’s growing arsenal is being developed in ways designed to confront the United States. Clearly the People’s Republic is doing more these days than preparing for the 2008 Olympics.

The full report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission released last week details the scope of China’s military buildup and the extent to which it is aimed at defeating the U.S. in any conflict over Taiwan.

“The Commission concluded that China is developing its military in ways that enhance its capacity to confront the United States,” the report states. “For example, China has developed capability to wage cyber-warfare and to destroy surveillance satellites overhead as part of its tactical, asymmetrical warfare arsenal.”

Gen. James E. Cartwright, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the commission that China is actively engaging in cyber-reconnaissance by probing the computer networks of U.S. government agencies as well as private companies.

The last paragraph of the article:
Former supreme leader Deng Xiaoping advised China’s military to “hide our capacities and bide our time, be good at maintaining a low profile.” Beijing’s ultimate weapon may be patience.

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Boycott Chinese goods when possible! Don’t fund China’s war against the U.S.

From the article:
The Chinese military hacked into a Pentagon computer network in June in the most successful cyber attack on the US defense department, say American ­officials.

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Printer version here.

China is striving to overtake the United States as the dominant power in cyberspace, according to a senior American general, in what is emerging as a new theatre of conflict between nation states and a growing priority for the Pentagon.

The Chinese foreign ministry rejected the Pentagon report as ‘brutal interference’

Lt Gen Robert Elder, commander of the 8th Air Force, said that all of America’s foes, including Iran, were looking at ways of hacking into US networks to glean trade and defence secrets.

But efforts by China set it apart. “They’re the only nation that has been quite that blatant about saying ‘we’re looking to do that’,” said Gen Elder in Washington.

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Diplomacide Mothballed

Diplomacide has been mothballed.
December 2017
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