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From the article:
New technology that can make tanks invisible has been unveiled by the Ministry of Defence.

In secret trials last week, the Army said it had made a vehicle completely disappear and predicted that an invisible tank would be ready for service by 2012.

The new technology uses cameras and projectors to beam images of the surrounding landscape onto a tank.

The result is that anyone looking in the direction of the vehicle only sees what is beyond it and not the tank itself.

A soldier, who was at the trials, said: “This technology is incredible. If I hadn’t been present I wouldn’t have believed it. I looked across the fields and just saw grass and trees – but in reality I was staring down the barrel of a tank gun.”

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From the article:
Russia accused the United States on Wednesday of accelerating attempts to deploy anti-missile defences in central Europe, despite Moscow’s request for a freeze on the project.

Washington’s negotiations with Poland and the Czech Republic over installing the defences “have not only not been suspended, but additional measures are being taken to speed them up,” said Foreign Ministry spokesman Mikhail Kamynin. “There is the impression that the United States is trying to make the realisation of its plans irreversible,” Kamynin said in a statement.

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From the article:
A successful U.S. test showed that Patriot systems could destroy incoming ballistic missiles in their final minute of flight, the Missile Defense Agency said Saturday.

A ship off Kauai in Hawaii fired a target missile at 3:15 a.m. EDT Saturday. Minutes later, soldiers with the U.S. Army’s 6th Air Defense Artillery Brigade launched an interceptor missile from Kauai that destroyed the target over the Pacific, according to the agency.

Officials said the flight test on Saturday, observed by Middle East allies, demonstrated the system’s ability to detect, track and intercept an incoming unitary target above the Earth’s atmosphere. They said the THAAD test met all objectives, including successful integration of the radar, launcher, fire control and communication and interceptor.

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From the article:
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin drew a parallel on Friday between U.S. plans for a missile shield in Europe and the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, widely regarded as the closest the world came to nuclear war.

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From the article:
The United States is imposing new sanctions against Iran’s military, three state-owned banks and more than 20 individuals accused of supporting terrorist activities in the Middle East.

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson announced the decision in Washington, Thursday. They said the sanctions include designating Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps as a proliferator of weapons of mass destruction and the elite al-Quds force as a supporter of terrorism.

The sanctions forbid any U.S. citizen or private organization from engaging in financial transactions with the Iranian institutions or individuals named.

Rice said the United States is committed to a diplomatic resolution with Iran, but warned the U.S. would act with the international community if Tehran continues down what she called “a path of confrontation.”

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From the article:
China launched its first lunar probe Wednesday. Japan sent an orbiter up last month. India is close behind. It’s an economic competition with military undertones.

As the rocket carrying China’s first lunar probe blasted off Wednesday evening, it left in its wake a vapor trail of questions about the nature of Asia’s new space race.

The continent’s giants are jockeying for position beyond the earth’s atmosphere. Japan launched its own moon orbiter last month. India plans to send a similar satellite up next year. The dawn of the Asian space age, however, has been darkened by suspicion, instead of cooperation.

“This means more competition because of the lingering security concerns all three countries have about one another,” says Bates Gill, director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. “Because of the military relevance of space missions and technology, real cooperation will be difficult.”

The moon shots, all designed to learn more about the lunar atmosphere and surface, have no military purpose, officials in the three new space powers are quick to point out. But in a field where civilian technological advances can easily be put to military use, nations closely scrutinize each of their neighbors’ steps forward.

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From the article:
A Chinese submarine will send test signals that could change the course of a satellite when China launches its first moon orbiter, as part of the country’s effort to develop space war technology, a human rights watchdog said Tuesday.

The Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said two survey ships are deployed in the South Pacific Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean to send signals to maneuver the lunar exploration satellite, expected to be launched Wednesday. At the same time, a nuclear-powered submarine will send simulated signals to the satellite as a test, it said in a statement.

Once the satellite-maneuvering technology matures, the group said, China would have the know-how to destroy other satellites in space in wartime. China could launch cheaply-made weapon-carrying objects into space and change their courses to destroy or damage satellites of other countries by sending signals from submarines, the center said.

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From the article:
Iran warned on Saturday it would fire off 11,000 rockets at enemy bases within the space of a minute if the United States launched military action against the Islamic republic.

“In the first minute of an invasion by the enemy, 11,000 rockets and cannons would be fired at enemy bases,” said a brigadier general in the elite Revolutionary Guards, Mahmoud Chaharbaghi.

“This volume and speed of firing would continue,” added Chaharbaghi, who is commander of artillery and missiles of the Guards’ ground forces, according to the semi-official Fars news agency.

The United States has never ruled out attacking Iran to end its defiance over the controversial Iranian nuclear program, which the US alleges is aimed at making nuclear weapons but Iran insists is entirely peaceful.

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From the article:
After five years in power, President Hu Jintao has finally gained unquestioned control of China’s massive military while transforming it into wealthy, high-tech fighting force, analysts said.

Although Hu was named Communist Party chief in 2002 and president in 2003, he did not inherit the mantle of commander-in-chief until a year later and questions had lingered over who commanded the allegiance of the country’s rapidly modernising, 2.3-million-strong People’s Liberation Army.

But key military appointments by Hu in the run-up to the five-yearly Communist Party Congress that is due to end Sunday in Beijing should help dispel any questions, experts said.

They include a new general chief of staff, the PLA’s highest uniformed position, and new commanders of its naval and air forces.

“It looks like he has full control over personnel now. He has continued to raise the military budget and will continue that. He’s well established in power now,” said Arthur Ding, a Chinese military expert at Singapore’s Nanyang Technology University.

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From the article:
For the first time in modern history, China will next year contribute more to global economic growth than the United States.

The landmark moment was predicted yesterday by the International Monetary Fund and is the latest illustration of the fast-growing Asian country’s importance to the world economy.

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Diplomacide Mothballed

Diplomacide has been mothballed.
October 2007
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